In my software engineering bootcamp, our progression from back to front end full stack engineering started with Ruby and Rails and moved on to vanilla JavaScript and React. After deploying several projects with a Rails API backend, I started wondering about different backend technologies as I started my job search and saw how in-demand Node.js programmers were in the current market. There’s a ton of articles which discuss the performance benefits, and pros and cons of Ruby on Rails and Node.js as backend technologies, but this blog mostly focuses on my experience as a Node.js …


Every week I meet with a group of developers to do algorithm problems and go over problem solving strategies to prepare for technical interviews. This past week, I encountered my first Fibonacci sequence problem: Nth Fibonacci Number, one of the most common coding interview problems that you might find. The problem is stated as this:

The Fibonacci sequence goes like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, …

The next number can be found by adding up the two numbers before it, and the first two numbers are always 1.

Write a function that takes an integer…


One of the first things I learned in my software engineering bootcamp is not to write code just to pass the tests. Just because I could spend a half hour tweaking a conditional statement to pass an RSpec test included in a project repository didn’t mean I understood how to solve the problem I was given. Oftentimes, really grappling with a difficult problem that you could maybe solve for only one specific case helped me more as a developer than getting all green tests. So it was a pleasant surprise to see how I had grown as a developer when…


Beginning in Mod 2 of Flatiron School, we moved from back-end concepts like MVC, object-oriented-programming, and relational databases, to the front-end for the very first time. At that point, most of us had only a basic understanding of HTML and CSS to style our index and show pages and crude forms, but everything we learned at Flatiron after Rails is focused on what we can see in the browser. …


Iterating via a for loop

When you first start learning JavaScript at Flatiron School the first big hurdle to overcome is the unfamiliarity of JavaScripts’ syntax. Curly braces, consts, and callback functions are unknown to us Rubyists. One of the things I initially struggled with was all the seemingly similar but somehow different ways of iterating over arrays in JavaScript: forEach, for…of, and for…in. They all, obviously, begin with for, and seem to do the same thing but with a different syntax. Prior to ECMAScript 2015 there were a few ways to execute a set of statements once for each object in a collection, namely…


Form_for and Form_tag

When learning Rails, one of the first things we’re introduced to is forms, which allow users to submit data into form fields. Forms in Rails allow us to meet the first requirement of CRUD, create, by allowing users to create new database records, build a contact form, and search in a search field. Rails gives us the flexibility to use built-in form helper methods and plain HTML form elements, but in this blog I will be focusing on the main differences between form_for and form_tag. …


One Easy Trick to Understanding Object Relations in Ruby

It’s all connected, man

One of the first obstacles to understanding Object Oriented Programming (OOP) in Ruby, is visualizing how objects relate to each other. In the first week at Flatiron School, you move quickly from isolated class-level objects, to objects that “belong-to” other objects who “have-many” objects that “belong-to” them. Finally, by the end of the week, you start working with objects that “have-many” objects through objects that also “have-many” objects. Lyft drivers, for example, have many passengers and Lyft passengers have many drivers. How are these two groups related to each other? They…

Sean Delaney

Full-stack software engineer

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